Thursday, December 17, 2009

Being Caring

"Do we care about children we don't know?"

--Dylan Ratigan

8 comments:

septembermom said...

Just yesterday, I was telling my two oldest boys about the nameless suffering young children out there who really don't get a Christmas. We need to remember them too. It's sad to think of what too many little ones must face each day.

Brosreview said...

One needs to help them kids to show how much one cares. After all, no one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.

I try all that is in my hands. And, this is contenting to me.

Judith Ellis said...

Kelly - You are such a dear mom and friend. These valuable lessons will not be lost on your children and I am happy to call you friend.

Judith Ellis said...

Good thought, Ajey. Thank you. I too do what I can every single day. I think as the need is so great in Detroit right now that my nieces and nephews will have to hold off from shopping sprees for a little. The attention is more urgent as children in Detroit are undoubtedly without. They'll understand. My brother, Haywood, suggested that I give to organizations he supports every year, the Salvation Army and Good Will. Both of these organizations were helpful to my mother raising 12 kids alone. I remember receiving boxes from them at Chirstmas time. I already support the Salvation Army and Goodwill, but I shall do a bit more now.

dave wheeler said...

Judith,

A good education is critical to breaking the cycle of poverty. I have been active in working with teachers/counselors for many years now trying to improve the quality of our public schools. You learn new things and you make a difference in the lives of great folks...educators, students, and the community...

Judith Ellis said...

Dave - I agree about the importance of education. I also think that there are some basic fundamentals of teaching your children that have been neglected. Society as a whole seems to be failing this generation. It really does take a village to raise a child. We had such growing up.

DB said...

"What do I care. He's not my kid."

One summer I worked at a camp. The children could roam all over the camp and there were conselors everywhere. Our rule was "You are responsible for the children you can see."

In the good weather I sit on the porch and watch the children going back and forth to the library. As long as I can see them, they're my kids.

Even those I couldn't see I helped. I gave money, when I had any. I gave toys, food, clothes.

Iknew the sadness of not having. One year I got the same Christmas present I got the year before, pulled out of the closet and rewrapped.

I can't do much these days, but if I can help it, no kid is going to be ignored on my watch.

D

Judith Ellis said...

Beautitful, DB, dear sir. If we all do whatever we can for those children we can and cannot see, this helps.