Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Being PETA

While the work that PETA does is commendable in many aspects, I often think that they go too far, often infringing upon the rights of others. I have written of this here before. Listening to a PETA spokesperson on a news show say that Michael Vick should not be allowed to make a living in his profession, after having gone to jail and serving 18 months, until he gets a brain scan is absolutely ridiculous. The spokesperson was annoyed that Vick could receive millions of dollars. He thinks that Vick isn't worthy of such. But the man served his time and has been working with the Humane Society. Who is PETA to deny another a livelihood? If Vick was a garbage collector before doing time should he now not be allowed to collect garbage? Should he not be allowed to make a living in his profession?

10 comments:

septembermom said...

I agree that PETA shouldn't get involved with determining how Mr. Vick should earn his money. After reading details about his crime, I have to admit that I'm still horrified about the inhumanity and cruelty to the dogs that were in his care. I hope for his sake that he has truly made a 360 degree turn. I can't believe that he could have been that cruel in the first place.

Judith Ellis said...

Kelly - Crime doesn't pay not only for the act itself, the time spent in prison if convicted, but that people will judge you, some perhaps for the rest of your life. I understand this very real human nature. But to truly forgive is divine. This is something that I actively work on.

What unnerved me is an organization that seeks to stand as righteous defender of some rights while denying the rights of others. Michael Vick did his time for doing the crime and PETA has no right whatsoever to insist that he needs to have his brain scanned before he can earn a living; they have no right whatsoever to insist that a man not be allowed to make a living.

What should also be realized for would be criminals is that some people will never forget such acts and will never forgive and this may affect your ability to make a living or live the life you once led. This is another consequence, just or not. But I pray that all would be given a second chance. If it were you or a member of your own family, whatever the crime, would you want such a chance?

With regards to Michael Vick personally, I hope that he actually received counseling that matters and that his behavior will indeed change. Who knows what kind of family he was raised in or his childhood environment that would breed such behavior. The fact that Tony Dungy, an honorable NFL coach, is working with him is encouraging. I wish him the best.

Marion said...

Judith, I'm with you on this one. I know people who have been in prison and I can tell you that their lives are never the same, ever.

This PETA crap is totally NUTS! What about people who abused women or children or murderers---they aren't demanding their brains be scanned? What is wrong with this picture? Mr. Vick did his time and now people should just leave him the hell alone. PETA should stick to worrying about animals and not trying to control another human being's life.

rebecca said...

I used to be a supporter of PETA many years ago but have not been for awhile precisely because I feel the organization has veered to the side of extremism. To negate Vick the manner in which he makes a living is not the issue; what should be the issue is whether or not he is rehabilitated and this is what should be PETA's concern. Aren't they in the field of educating people and bringing empathy and knowledge to light? To condemn Vick, after he has served his time and possibly learned of the brutality of the sport, is to negate the hopes of what their wishes seem to be: to educate. If they would only stick to their organization's mission statement and cease on the personal vitriol against abusers and judge without finding out whether or not they have been rehabilitated (and I sincerely hope that in Vick's case it is true), they would maintain their respectability as an organization. Unfortunately, the way they are conducting their business and themselves, I believe, they have lost the respect of many, including myself.

Judith Ellis said...

Oh, Marion, I love you! I laughed my head off reading your "This PETA crap is totally NUTS!" and the remaining words I could not have written any better. Thank you so much for this comment.

My brothers are ministers and counselors and they counsel men and women who were in prison who have done harm to others, usually people, and they have made a positive impact on their lives. Most have not returned to a life of crime. I'd say some 98 percent.

My deceased brother, Tim, used to hire former convicts on a regular basis as do I RIGHT NOW in my business. As a former asst. GM for a large mixed-use hotel, I hired them as well. I never had one incident and my door was always open to them in particular.

There is hope for those who have committed crimes! Yes, there is! Thanks again, Marion. Your words are appreciated indeed.

Judith Ellis said...

Rebecca...Rebecca....Rebecca...your response is absolutely brilliant and beautiful. I only wish that others can read it on a much larger scale. How can this be done? Let's think about that. Maybe I can submit via the Huffington Post, giving you credit, of course. Email me: judedellis@gmail.com. I love these words and value you too. Thank you.

Ryan Freed said...

Great comment by Rebecca. PETA is certainly veering towards extremism. They protect animals rights at all costs. They sometimes take extreme measures to educate people about inhumane activities towards animals, like Rebecca said.

Then Vick is put in jail and a lesson is learned across the world, since this was a HUGE story in the media when it occured. Many sports stars are given much less jail time for crimes equivalent or worse than this, justice was served. Now PETA expects more? It seems they care about the rights of animals over human rights.

Judith Ellis said...

Oh my, Ryan! The comments on this posts and others today is one of the reasons I blog: to learn from others and be challenged! Thank you so much for your words of wisdom and truth here. Know that they are appreciated, my thoughtful young friend.

Bob said...

You're right about people thinking differently when their loved ones are involved. Andy Reid, the Eagles coach, had a big part in the decision to hire Vick: Reid's two sons were charged a couple of years ago with drug felonies. Reid said that made him more understanding.

Judith Ellis said...

Love the honesty of the Eagles' coach, Bob. I'm sure Vick's talent also played a large role in the selection as well. Thanks for the story.