Monday, December 15, 2008

Being Fearless

Being fearless is not the absence of fear; it is moving forward in spite of it.

10 comments:

Ellington Ellis said...

This is of a truth!

judith ellis said...

Thank you, dear brother, for popping in. This is what I think of when fear intrudes. It enables me to get a handle on it and gives tremendous courage. It is not the fear that we battle, but the hope that we embrace that matters.

I watched you as a teenager as my pastor and have watched you for years in business and I am forever blessed by what I saw and what I continue to see. You are fearless! Thank you.

Rhi said...

This is so true. I am so fascinated and intrigued by your blog. There are many awards that circulate among bloggers, and one that I received was the "Kreativ Blogger Award." I'd now love to pass it on to you. =) The information and rules for the award are on My Blog. Thanks for being such a great blogging friend.

judith ellis said...

Rhi - Thank you much for your encouraging words. I love the photos on your blog and your sense of adventure.

All the best with your performing. I so remember the dedication and sweet desire involved. Remain fearless, my friend.

I will check out your blog today, as I often do.

Rhi said...

Thank you so much, Judith! And... have my eyes deceived me... Leontyne Price?!?!? Not only a superb singer and famous lady, but one of my all-time favorites and a definite idol. What great opportunity allowed your paths to cross? I'm extremely jealous.

judith ellis said...

Yes, you are right, Leontyne Price. I have met the legend more than a few times. But the first was when I was in college backstage at the Metropolitan Opera. I did not even tell her I was a singer, but she looked at me and said, "You must be a singer. Jump on in. The water's fine."

Leontyne Price is without doubt an all-time favorite of mine and an amazing trailblazer. I honor her as well as the great contralto Marian Anderson for their fearlessness in the midst of great odds. Without the latter, many others may not have had the opportunity to sing at the MET.

Many thanks also to the wonderful Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution when they refused to let Anderson perform at Constitution Hall in Washington D.C. Roosevelt resigned and arranged for an open-air concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Many thousands attended. Both were fearless women!

One of my voice teachers, George Shirley, was also fearless. He was the first African American tenor to sing at the Metropolitan Opera. He was fearless and a mentor and second dad to many aspiring young singers everywhere. We love him, dearly.

Catvibe said...

Isn't that the truest thing...

judith ellis said...

I believe it most certainly is, Cat. I, for one, have to identify fear often before I move forward. Often times it's a quick acknowledgment of what I am presently experiencing and then...ONWARD STILL!

Catvibe said...

Ho!

judith ellis said...

"Ho!" sounds so festive! :-)