Saturday, January 31, 2009

Being in the Old Guard III

Having written more than a few post about the Old Guard, Being in the Old Guard and Being in the Old Guard II, seeing this picture made me once again think about the necessity of fresh faces and ideas in the Senate.


Yes, there is a storm gathering and a rocky road ahead, but can these senators get us there? What do you think? Do you think the Senate needs fresh faces and ideas? Can these senators really do anything differently? I am beginning to really have doubts.

6 comments:

John O'Leary said...

Judith, we clearly need fresh, inspirational leaders today, whose vision transcends partisanship. Where will the next Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Rod Blogojevich appear? (Sorry, sometimes I just can't help myself...)

dave wheeler said...

I think the new ideas and leaders are out there but they can't "buy" a seat at the table given the advantages have incumbents have in elections at every level. Real change will begin when real election reform takes place, when the financial playing field is leveled or access to media is provided to get the alternative views and opinions out there in the national debate.

judith ellis said...

John - When I look at these guys I can't help but to say "what are we doing?" Do we actually expect them to do anything different? And it's not an age thing; it's a vision thing.

Many of these guys simply have no vision and "without a vision the people parish." What are we going to do right now?! When are they up for re-election? When are we going to take back the democratic process of "for the people and by the people?"

Yeah, the next Blagojevich will arise from the power of governmental office. Actually, we already know that they exist. His likes seem embedded in the very political system itself. Again, I am not talking about perfection; I'm talking about intentions. Enough!

judith ellis said...

"Real change will begin when real election reform takes place, when the financial playing field is leveled or access to media is provided to get the alternative views and opinions out there in the national debate."

Dave - I so agree with this statement. I think technology is breaking up this power base. Let's see how it influences "real change" over these next four years and how we can participate in greater ways.

Technology has already had an impact on the election process; let's see how it works in the governing process. But technology needs us and we must ALL ACT NOW, doing our various parts to bring about "real change!"

dave wheeler said...

Judith,
I'm reading an interesting book right now titled "the cult of the amateur, how today's internet is killing our culture" by Andrew Keen. He characterizes much of Web 2.0 as " Ignorance, meets egotism, meets bad taste, meets mob rule". Interesting perspective for sure.

Technology can indeed be a marvelous thing and it might well play a key role in election reform. As for governing, as long as policy is influenced who finances your campaign, little will change. This is why involvement and engagement at the community level is now more important than ever.

judith ellis said...

Thanks for your comment, Dave, and for the heads up on the book. I'll pick it up. I remain supportive of technology; it is indeed a wonderful thing, but not a substitute of other necessary things like those you have mentioned.