Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Being Unknowledgeable

It is the very notion of otherness that changes reality. The difficulty is what we do not see thus cannot comprehend. But it is upon not knowing that we build structures of all kind and stubbornly hold on to them even after it becomes obvious that they are flawed. What the banking system has become is such an example.

Corruption is often built on not knowing. Destructive forces such as arrogance, pride, and greed are built and fortified on not knowing, though never acknowledged. But is is the acknowledgment of not knowing that brings things out in the open and calls for openness and less secretive structures. The derivatives upon derivatives is such an example.

With the acknowledgment that we do not know everything (even those things that we are now engaged in) will come a deeper understanding, appreciation, and curiosity that there is so much more to know. This will forever forge new paths paved with greater sincerity and a humility that listens and learns and despises arrogance, pride and greed--even when we recognize them in ourselves.

It is not being unknowledgeable that corrupts; it is not acknowledging that my knowledge may be flawed and my stubborn inability to change. This is what insisidiously and pervasively corrupts.

6 comments:

Catvibe said...

And oh, the desire to be right, despite the massive evidence proving otherwise.

judith ellis said...

Aren't we so great at inventing things to prove our point, complicating reality even further?

Catvibe said...

So much. It's a morass of epic proportions.

judith ellis said...

Agreed. But what is needed is to to see ourselves honestly and not forget who we are, working to change those things that could be better.

James, the brother of Jesus, speaks about the man who "observes his natural face in a mirror, for he observes himself, goes away and immediately forgets what kind of man he was." It is not enough to see who we are and ignore it. We must face ourselves honestly, yet compassionately and work to be better.

With this same compassion that we give ourselves, we must extend to others. What is disarming is that we often do not see ourselves, yet we can see others so clearly. This is self deception.

Catvibe said...

Being willing to admit you don't know and that you might not be right is a good start. I try to live by that creed. But I also think we deceive ourselves by not seeing our own good. How many times have I criticized myself and my abilities to the point of crippling inaction? How much of what we see in the world is a manifestation of those negative views we privately tell ourselves...

judith ellis said...

Beautifully spoken, catvibe, and so true. Thank you. All the very best, today and always!